Archives du mot-clé Opera

Opera’s (not-so-)secret agenda

Opera’s (not-so-)secret agenda. Behold.

To account for the shortfall in humor this year, Opera has issued official comedic guidelines to direct corporate humour decisions and metrics for the reminder of 2007. These dates will form the cornerstone of Opera’s new EULA :-)

April 1, 2007
No jokes allowed
April 2, 2007
Jokes allowed
April 20, 2007
Try swim stunt again
May 11, 2007
Jon goes to see Dave Gahan of Depeche Mode in concert Note to self: don’t transcribe everything CEO says
June 5, 2007
Opera holds dress as a troll day
August 14, 2007
Bork browser turns 4 1/2 safety reminder: light after cutting candle in half
September 12, 2007
Insert totaly hilarious Web 2.0 / YouTube / Back-to-school thingie here
October 31, 2007
Opera employees dress normal business casual
November 5, 2007
Opera caught underneath Houses of Parliament with single sparkler
November 13, 2007
HR solds Sadie Hawkins dance

Get the real stuff (April Fool’s policy)

You’ve been warned.

flattr this!

Some Devon Young’s great posts

Devon Young’s tech blog is gone (Been 86’d—surely a phrase, but I don’t know its meaning). This is sad, because there was a lot of interesting things there.

Now, the good news: thank to Opera’s fantastic caching system, I can still read it: Opera does not refresh a page when re-opening a session and this is GREAT (he is the only to do that, as far as I know). This is the second time that this feature helps me—it even doesn’t refresh if you close a tab and unclose it :-).

Now, thanks to Opera and Devon Young’s approval, I decided to post some posts.


Remove 75% of the spam on WordPress 2.1

original post

[…] The spambots weren’t using the form to post anything, they were just directly accessing the wp-comments-post.php file. Which surprised me. It didn’t surprise me that they were doing it. It surprised me that WordPress was allowing that. So I realized I had to create a small change in the script, that should’ve already been coded in by the WordPress coders before release. So at the start of the file, before any of the code that’s already there, I added this line:

if(strstr($_SERVER['HTTP_REFERER'],"devonyoung.com")) {

Then after all the code, I added these 4 lines:

} else { 	echo "You tried to bypass the form."; }

These 4 lines of code, reduced spam by about 75%. Yet, some spambots are somehow still posting comments. So I checked really quick and discovered that the ones still getting their posts through, aren’t using the comment form or the wp-comments-post.php. Huh? Now that surprises me. Anyone know how they can manage that? I know a little about WordPress, but not enough to know how this works. Likely, the spambots are exploiting a security hole or a bug in the system. I’m using WordPress 2.1.

Spamproof email address, with CSS

I think this is a case of parallel invention, since Devon Young doesn’t mention any inspiration, but this had already been done by the Polish Literary Moose (interview).

Anyway, here it goes:

p a:before { 	content: "soy"; } p a:after { 	content: "devonyoung.com"; }

This address is selectable with Opera (and Opera only; others will use their eyes). It is the only one I know to do this. That might be worth including in any Opera evangelism.

A Google limitation

I copy the whole of it, that’s better.

As if I wasn’t having enough problem with their Feedfetcher bot. Apparently Google thinks www.devonyoung.com is equivalent to devonyoung.com, because it applied my www’s robots.txt to my entire domain.

I used Google’s automatic URL removal system to remove all references to my outdated www. subdomain from the Google database.

I clicked the link titled “Remove pages, subdirectories or images using a robots.txt file” and typed http://www.devonyoung.com/robots.txt in the appropriate textbox. That robots.txt has disallow: / in it, so no crawlers will bother with the defunct subdomain. Knowing that robots.txt lists what you want a spider to ignore, I expected that what was listed, would be what would be removed. What else could it mean?

This morning, I wake up to find that my entire devonyoung.com domain is missing from Google. Try it, search for it. It’s gone. You can’t even google my name to get it. So apparently Google cannot distinguish between a www. and the main domain itself.

That was irritating, but I thought that fixing this would be relatively easy. I just go in again and type http://devonyoung.com/robots.txt (without www.) in the appropriate textbox, right? No. This caused Google to give me a notice that every single thing at my main domain will further be gone (again?), and not just the things I list in the robots.txt as ignorable.

What makes this even more painful and annoying is this note at the URL Removal System:

all pages submitted via the automatic URL removal system will be removed from the Google index temporarily for six months

This is more than fairly irritating. For 6 months, my entire website won’t be listed in Google. I only wanted the outdated and defunct stuff removed, and I get burned.

Oh, one more thought on this subject. They never confirmed with me that I had any authority to delete all references to the domain from their database. That just sounds like a huge security risk. I imagine I could sign up using an anonymous hotmail address and remove all references to microsoft domains from Google’s database. I bet Google would hear about that.

Sorry for the rant, but I thought you might all want to know about this for SEO reasons.

NewsFire limitation

I used it for a while (now I use NetnewsWire). In case you don’t know, it is a cool-looking RSS reader for OS X (it is made by David Watanabe. Nuff said).

Bottom line: NewsFire does not respect 301 notification (301 status code means file moved, so stop looking for it here. It is there now.).

Oh, by the way: Google’s RSS bot (Feedfetcher) don’t give a shit neither. Yep, Google sucks on this, he ignores my Redirect permanent.

Devon has a nice name for these rude bots: Deaf user agents.

flattr this!

Opera’s Print preview is unreliable

And I prove it: consider this page.

  • The text will be on one PDF page (on OS X: cmd+p, preview)
  • But print preview will tell you two pages (File, Print preview)

Opera 9.10’s Print Preview function will show this page as two print pages, while OS X’s Export as PDF will produce only one. Maybe Apple is badly implementing PDF, but the fact is that we can’t rely on Print Preview.

When you are going to print a book, you’d better be sure of the result.


CSS is minimal

flattr this!

Les exclusivités d’Opera

Initialement publié le 17 avril 2006 à 19:03:41

Exclusivités

  • Titres numérotés Gecko en fait désormais autant
  • Espaces fines insécables Gecko en fait désormais autant
  • Sélection de texte autogénéré
  • Retours chariot CSS (\a, de mémoire)
  • Le seul à pouvoir correctement utiliser run-in avec du display:after (les dernières compilations nocturnes de Webkit ont réglé le problème ; mais pas la dernière nocturne de Gecko 1.9)
  • La meilleure gestion de l’attribut cite à ce jour grâce aux liens en cascade (CLink)

Exemples

Sur ce blog

Démonstration de la puissance d’Opera
Démonstration de la puissance d’Opera

Le texte cité est une liste de définitions (en gras, les dt). Les deux_points et espaces les précédants sont autogénérés (quand on y pense, c’est de la présentation, tout ça).

Si vous cliquiez sur le texte violet en bas, ça vous emmènerait sur la page de source. Et vous pourriez aussi le sélectionner, quand bien même il est autogénéré depuis l’attribut title.

Bien entendu, il n’a pas le problème de Safari avec les guillemets, qu’il localise comme demandé (Firefox le fait aussi correctement).

Soyons honnêtes : Opera a du mal avec les enrichissements typographiques et surexploite les déliés (vous le voyez en bas). D’une manière générale, Opera a du mal avec Mac. Il n’empêche, c’est bien, tout ça.

Autre

Un autre exemple que je compte bien (re)mettre en action dans la nouvelle version du site Web, les compteurs (counter, conter-increment) :

h3:before	{ 	content:counter(thetitre3) "."; 	counter-increment:thetitre3; 	}
Un exemple simple
Un exemple simple
Un exemple plus évolué
Un exemple plus évolué

Le fichier HTML

Notez que dans le dernier exemple, les astérisques peuvent tout à fait être rendus par une autre navigateur ; en effet, il n’y a aucune numérotation derrière.

Notez également que les postulats des titres (h*), qui ne sont pas des blocs, mais des lignes, ont été totalement revus en XHTML 2.0 (à l’avenir cependant incertain). Les compteurs ne devraient donc plus être nécessaires (pour cette utilisation) dans cette nouvelle mouture du langage par excellence du Web.

Voir aussi

  1. Télécharger Opera
    • en version stable. Préférez la version anglaise, la version française étant très en retard
    • en version beta. La version 9 est en bêta, j’en ai fait une revue (pour la bêta 1) et c’est celle que j’utilise, preuve de sa stabilité
  2. D’autres articles sur Opera, sur ce blog
  3. Le blog de Laurent Denis, chantre francophone d’Opera et spécialisé dans l’accessibilité
  4. Wikipédia — Opera et Wikipédia — Liste des fonctionnalités du navigateur Opera
  5. Les primeurs d’Omniweb, où je glorifie un autre navigateur
  6. Des caption pour les listes, où je traite d’un autre problème lié aux énumérations

flattr this!

Copier-coller de tableau

Source de l’excercice : Déclinaisons latines.

Copier-coller un tableau depuis Safari

Nominatif singulier civis mare consul corpus pater urbs animal febris Vocatif singulier civis mare consul corpus pater urbs animal febris Accusatif singulier civem mare consulem corpus patrem urbem animal febrim Génitif singulier civis maris consulis corporis patris urbis animalis febris Datif singulier civi mari consuli corpori patri urbi animali febri Ablatif singulier cive mari consule corpore patre urbe animali febri Nominatif pluriel cives maria consules corpora patres urbes animalia febres Vocatif pluriel cives maria consules corpora patres urbes animalia febres Accusatif pluriel cives maria consules corpora patres urbes animalia febres Génitif pluriel civium marium consulum corporum patrum urbium animalium febrium Datif pluriel civibus maribus consulibus corporibus patribus urbibus animalibus febribus Ablatif pluriel civibus maribus consulibus corporibus patribus urbibus animalibus febribus

Copier-coller un tableau depuis Opera et Mozilla

Nominatif singulier	civis	mare	consul	corpus	pater	urbs	animal	febris Vocatif singulier	civis	mare	consul	corpus	pater	urbs	animal	febris Accusatif singulier	civem	mare	consulem	corpus	patrem	urbem	animal	febrim Génitif singulier	civis	maris	consulis	corporis	patris	urbis	animalis	febris Datif singulier	civi	mari	consuli	corpori	patri	urbi	animali	febri Ablatif singulier	cive	mari	consule	corpore	patre	urbe	animali	febri Nominatif pluriel	cives	maria	consules	corpora	patres	urbes	animalia	febres Vocatif pluriel	cives	maria	consules	corpora	patres	urbes	animalia	febres Accusatif pluriel	cives	maria	consules	corpora	patres	urbes	animalia	febres Génitif pluriel	civium	marium	consulum	corporum	patrum	urbium	animalium	febrium Datif pluriel	civibus	maribus	consulibus	corporibus	patribus	urbibus	animalibus	febribus Ablatif pluriel	civibus	maribus	consulibus	corporibus	patribus	urbibus	animalibus	febribus

Comme vous le voyez, Mozilla et Opera ne modifient pas les tabulations pour rendre les tableaux esthétiques en texte (ce qui n’est pas forcément une mauvaise idée si on veut en faire autre chose que tu texte brut).

Mais quoi qu’il en soit, c’est mieux que Safari.

D’un autre côté, celui-ci réagit au ctrl+k

flattr this!